Wednesday, 15 February 2017

Final Broadway Dig Open Day

Our Broadway dig is coming to an end, so we are holding a final open day on Monday, 20th February from 10:30-15:00. Come along and visit the excavation, talk to our archaeologists, handle some of the finds, and find out about the fascinating history of the area.

We have got evidence of some of Broadway's earliest known residents: Mesolithic hunter-gatherers living around 10,000 years ago; and some intriguing and unusual Bronze Age finds dating back over 4000 years. The main focus of the site is a complex Iron Age and Roman settlement, with fantastic Roman finds emerging.

Car parking is not available on-site so please use the public car park on Childswickham Road (off Cheltenham Road). The site is a 5-minute walk from the car park via footpaths from Cheltenham Road (see map below).


Map of site showing car park and public footpaths

Stout footwear is advised, as the site and the footpaths may be muddy! Visitors should gather by the entrance to the site, where artefacts will be on display. Tours of the site will be conducted by our archaeologists.

There is no need to book – just drop in and find out more about the thousands of years of history beneath your feet!

Monday, 6 February 2017

Strong Rooms Project update

In June 2016 we blogged about the exciting Strong Rooms project that Worcestershire Archive and Archaeology Service (WAAS) was taking part in. The Arts Council funded Strong Rooms Project is coming to a close at the end of February 2017 but Archives West Midlands will ensure a legacy for the art installation which toured the West Midlands during the summer of 2016. Throughout the project WAAS worked closely with Warwickshire County Council Archives, with Culture Coventry, with Dudley Archives and with lead artist Mohammed Ali of Soul City Arts and its production manager, Steve Mclean. 


One of the Strong Room shipping containers, with exterior by artist Mohammed Ali


The two shipping containers, pictured here, were installed, consecutively, for one week each in Rugby, Coventry, Dudley and Worcester, attracting around 7,250 visitors. For the exterior, Mohammed depicted the story of a Warwickshire lady, Dorothie Feilding, who served the allied troops in World War 1 as an ambulance driver and nurse and who's collection of family letters is curated by the County Record Office. The interior of each container houses several art pieces reflecting stories from across the West Midlands via audio and visual media.


The second Strong Room shipping container, showing a depiction of Dorothie Fielding, along with the team behind the Project


For more details of the tour and of the significant community element to this project please visit the Strong Rooms website. If you are inspired to do some archive research, remember you can visit us here at Worcestershire Archive and Archaeology Service or you can visit any of the partners: Culture Coventry; Dudley Archives and Warwickshire Record Office.  

Thursday, 19 January 2017

Upcoming Orchards and Local History Workshops

Are you interested in orchards and local history? We have the perfect workshop for you!


 


Worcestershire Archive and Archaeology Service will be running two free workshops in Evesham and Tenbury Libraries next month to look at how people can research local orchards and local history with sources held in the archives and in local libraries.

Picking apples - photo from the Worcestershire Photographic Survey

Orchards are an important and much loved part of the historic landscape of Worcestershire (and our neighbouring counties) and we have long been famous for them. They are now the focus of a Heritage Lottery Funded project, which is seeking to help restore orchards and to provide people with the knowledge to look after them. They are also seeking to find out more about local orchards in particular areas to help manage the landscapes.

The workshops will look at sources we hold in The Hive and those held within local libraries, which can be used to investigate local history and particularly orchards. We will have some local examples of these available to view.

1880 OS Map of Rochford - many of the fields are shown at orchards

We hope the workshops will encourage you to volunteer to help research orchards in the Tenbury/Rochford and Evesham/Chadbury areas over the next few months. With guidance and support we are looking for helpers to look at maps, newspapers, census records and photos to see what information can be found in the community. The aim is to gather information and stories to contribute to a walk/talk led by one of our archaeologists in the spring. A report will also be produced which will help with the care of orchards in the future and ensure they are rightly recognised. All are welcome to attend the workshops and there is no commitment to any further involvement by doing so.

The workshops will be held as follows:
  • Evesham Library on Friday, 17th February 10am-12pm (previously advertised 10 Feb)
  • Tenbury Library on Saturday, 11th February 10am-12pm

At the end of each workshop there will be an opportunity to stay on and have a look again at some of the maps and sources and ask questions about your own research or about the project.

If you would like to come along, or just find out more, please phone Paul on 01905 766352 or email explorethepast@worcestershire.gov.uk

Sunday, 25 December 2016

Christmas in the Trenches in WWI


Letters home give an insight into the experiences of soldiers on the front line during WWI, including reflections on Christmas in the trenches. Some such letters were written by Rev John MacRae, Rector of All Saints Worcester, who volunteered as a chaplain and wrote back to his congregation to tell them about Christmas 1915 out in France with the soldiers.
Rev John MacRae


MacRae had only recently arrived, after being appointed in October. As well as leading services and supporting soldiers’ spiritual needs chaplains also chose to muck in and help in the practical tasks and carried out many of the same jobs as the soldiers. This included helping to build shelters, cooking, and transporting supplies. Being with the soldiers in the trenches meant they were exposed to many of the same risks from shellfire and snipers, and exposed to many health risks, and a number of chaplains died during the war.


At Christmas MacRae led two services for the men, adapting to what conditions he could find. One was held in a barn for his own Company, and he then carried out another in an orchard for another group. He would have liked to have led more for other soldiers but could not find the transport to travel further afield.

MacRae was elected mess president, and tried to obtain geese or turkeys for Christmas dinner, although when they arrived they were rather small and insufficient to feed a group of hungry men. However, they managed to get a pig too to help feed everyone. Cooking in these primitive conditions must have been a challenge.

Presents from home were always important to soldiers, particularly at Christmas time. At All Saints they were working hard to support the troops and over Christmas MacRae received a parcel containing 26 pairs of socks, 8 pairs of mittens and cuffs, and 17 mufflers to distribute, plus a body belt for their Rector. 20,000 cigarettes arrived shortly after too.

Weather conditions were also hard, and MacRae related the problem all soldiers suffered from, which was being wet most of the time with little opportunity to dry themselves or clothes once they got wet. 

We know from the Museum of Army Chaplaincy that MacRae was interviewed for the role in September 1915 and appointed Temporary Chaplain to the Forces 4th Class on 18 October 1915. The interview cards have been digitised by the Museum, and included is information that he passed his medical, could ride a horse, lived at 104 Bath Road, was married with 2 children, would be free in two weeks, and had references from the Bishop and Dean of Worcester.



The Museum also holds the personal notebook of the Rev Harry Blackburne DSO who was the Assistant Chaplain General to the 1st Army.  He records his impressions of the Anglican chaplains who served with him in 1st Army.  The entry for Rev J E Macrae reads:



MACRAE J E – 19th Division.

A large man with a strong personality.





Rev John MacRae left the army on 23 October 1916 and returned to All Saints, Worcester. In late 1919 he chaired the first few meetings of the parish War Memorial Committee before leaving to return to his native Scotland.



You can read more about the role of chaplains in WWI on the BBC website here.
You can also search for records of other chaplains at the
 
Chaplains Museum site.  




Letter from Worcester Chaplain

Rev.J Macrae's experiences on the Western Front [published Worcester Herald 16 Jan 1916]



     In a letter to his parishioners, apparently written on Ne Year's Eve, the Rev. J.E.MacRae, Rector of All Saint's, Worcester, who is serving as an Army Chaplain in France, says,

     "This is to wish you everything good for the New Year. We had no festivity last night for we could not procure anything to be festive with, and dined on some rather ancient beef, which as the newly installed mess president, I had to contrive into a stew: boiled rice and a pound of prunes completed the modest meal. Afterwards we visited the sergeants mess – to wit twelve of them in a wash-house behind the farm: planks on boxes for a table, candles stuck in bottles et tout cela. Fortunately, we had procured a turkey for them: they supplied at 9pm. We made cheerful speeches and hoped all would be ended before another twelvemonth: then to bed, expecting the guns, which had been silent most of the afternoon, to salute the New Year. They didn't, and the night passed without a shot, so far as we could hear, for the wind was from the north."

     In another passage, relating to the obtainment of supplies, Mr MacRae says, the 22 geese we ordered from E Force canteen could not be got: so I was promised turkeys instead. Last night S came back with turkeys, small birds only 8lbs each – no good – so we sent him to buy a pig as well for our men’s Christmas dinner. Tonight we have found a large oven, and the 'grub' and beer will be consumed in the barns in their groups – a rough and not very ready picnic, but the best we can do.

     "I wonder if people at home can picture the condition under which we actually live here? The newspapers, one and all, have told such tales of marvellous organisation, comfort in abundance, and so forth, that the real facts of crowding in barns – lucky if straw if handy – and everything being done in field and orchard, with the roughest food that a man can eat and keep healthy, are lost sight of. The men go for a fortnight or more without taking clothes off, day or night, till somehow, when in reserve, getting in one of the wash-houses some miles distant. Can anyone at home picture what this means in winter time? When we get wet – and that's often – nothing can be dried, and we just go on and hope for a little sunshine in the course of a week.

     "January 4th – We shifted down here yesterday again into huts and the mud. These shifts are days of strenuous toil for each and all – pack, lift, sit down, and rearrange everything – a job that cannot be completed in daylight anyhow. A scrimmage for food, tumble in as best we can, and on the morrow try to contrive means of existence for unknown days ahead of us. My job as chaplain, of course, has to go on one side for a day or two, and I help to get our men's various necessary affairs along, that we may live. Today I cut drains all around our hut, and built a brick and mud Kitchener for rough cooking, as our stove is worn out.

     "Yesterday, by a great stroke of luck, my parcels at last arrived. W's box is A1. A parcel of comforts too, from ladies of All Saints Parish came – quite an unexpected boon. Tell them (I will write also) that, for men just out of the trenches, socks, etc, are an absolute Godsend. Those sent will be given to Worcester men. I had also 20,000 cigarettes from L.I.S's sister. It was a lucky day for me. We got all our belongings in dry – a blessing only those who live in the open will appreciate.

     "On Sunday I had two very interesting services. One for a company from the other battalion of our diocese, in an orchard behind a shattered church; the other in a barn for our company. Christmas hymns – as we stood round as best we could, crowded together. The French women of the farm peeped across their yard, and seemed impressed with our singing, which was certainly very effective. Had my horse been available I would have had two more services.


     "You do not seem to have had all my letters. Can the Censor have been busy. I also sent a dozen others to people in Worcester. I am quite fit and well".

Rev Rich Johnson, All Saints Worcester




We showed the letter to John's present day successor at All Saints, Rev Dr Rich Johnson, to see what he thought of MacRae's experiences. He said:



“This wonderful story of the life and service of one of my predecessors makes me wonder what I would have done in his place. This story is a reminder that the church exists to make a difference in the mess and pain of our broken world.  The message of Jesus does not offer us an escape from the world or some nice ideas which to deny the reality of it, but rather calls us to wade in deep and bring hope and love, both with our words and our actions.  The Rev John MacRae exemplified this, leaving behind the relative security and comfort of life in Worcester, to serve those serving on the frontline.  That is in fact, the call on the whole church; to put the needs of others before our own.  The example and inspiration of my predecessor lives on in the parish of All Saints to this day, for instance, as we partner with others to run Worcester Foodbank, a debt centre and help find homes for children in care."  

Friday, 23 December 2016

1870s Christmas Decorations

In the 1870s local newspaper used to have a write up of the Christmas decorations put up locally, including the local churches. Sadly we don't have any photos of these decorations in the archives from this period, but the descriptions help us to image them. Christmas decorations had only recently come back into fashion, along with the general increase in popularity of Christmas, being described by the reporter as a 'recently revived art of modern culture'. That people could recall a time when decorations were not put up ties in with the theory that there was a boom in Christmas celebrations from the 1840s and 1850s, coinciding with Dicken's Christmas stories.

The first set of reports we include are from Berow's Worcester Journal of 27 December 1873. The majority of decorations were combinations of flowers (including Christmas Roses) and traditional evergreens such as holly, ivy, mistletoe and yew, alongside Bible verses. Wool and cloths were also used for decorations.

St Helen's


At each church the reporter lists the people involved, and there appears to have been teams of dedicated women and some men at each place helping to create festive decorations. Old St Martin's is described as being strikingly beautiful. All Saints was decorated with Christmas roses, flowers, yew and evergreens along with red and white woollen banners. Perhaps favouring 'less is more' a number of churches are praised for simple and tasteful decorations.




St Swithun's




The second set are from the Worcester Herald of 1877. Decorations at each location seem to be similar. Once again the reporter is appreciative of the efforts of each church. St George's Barbourne was described as being one of the best, with a centre piece of holly and white lilies. St Stephen's in addition to the usual decorations and texts had verses from O Come All Ye Faithful featured. The reporter praised a number of churches for their simplicity, such as at St Nicholas where their decorations are described as plain but neat. Others appear to have struggled, with St Alban's, a very small church, only managing simple decorations with few people to help, although the reporter is very sympathetic.

St Nicholas


300 years of Worcestershire newspapers are available on microfilm in our Self Service section on level 2 in The Hive. What will you discover?