News

Update on Clara Bauerle and the Bella in the wych elm story

  • 16th December 2016

Earlier in the year we posted a blog ‘Who put Bella in the wych elm‘ as part of our Monthly Mysteries series.  In it we hinted that the link with Clara Bauerle, the German singer and actress, was one which was still being actively explored.  We can now reveal that the researcher who was following this lead believes she has finally laid this story to rest.

Giselle Jakobs recently published a blog in which she stated that she had finally traced a copy of Clara Bauerle’s death registration.  This indicated that Clara died on 16 December 1942 from veronal poisoning in a Berlin hospital so could not be the mystery woman discovered in Hagley Wood in April 1943.

For details of Giselle’s discovery and a copy of the death registration please see her original blog post.

 

Maggie Tohill

Cataloguing Archivist

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