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A school visit to Roman Worcester

  • 12th December 2014

Last week a school made a return visit to us to find out all about Roman Worcester and the archaeology beneath The Hive. Somers Park had already been studying the Romans, including the Roman army, and this was a great way to link the bigger picture with what was happening locally.

 Prior to the building of The Hive Worcestershire Archaeology carried out an excavation to reveal part of a Roman town with a row of shops alongside a road down to the river. We started our school group started outside as we looked together at the landscape surrounding The Hive and tried to spot where some of our finds have been put – such as the pieces of iron slag which are now inserted in a wall. 

Once the school group ventured inside The Hive Rob, our Community Archaeologist, got the children looking at some of the finds discovered here, including animal bones, pottery, and environmental remains (these are only visible under the microscope!). The children were amazed to be able to handle objects which were almost 2,000 years old. The pottery was especially appropriate as a lot of it is Severn Valley Ware, which was made in Malvern – possibly at a kiln just a street away from their school!

If you’d like to find out about how we can help schools with the Romans, or other subjects, please ring us on 01905 766352 or email explorethepast@worcestershire.gov.uk

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